Toe Spur

MIDFOOT JOINT SPUR

Spurs may grow on top of any of the midfoot joints. They often occur where a metatarsal bone joints a tarsal bone. These spurs may form a bump on the top of the foot. You may feel pain when wearing shoes.

Spur Removal. To get rid of the bump, the spur is removed on both sides of the joint. You can bear weight on your foot right after surgery. You will need to wear a surgical shoe for a few weeks.

FLEXIBLE HAMMERTOES

When hammertoes are flexible, you can straighten the buckled joints. Flexible hammertoes may become rigid over time. Corns, irritation, and pain are common symptoms.

Tendon Release. This treatment helps release the buckled joint. The bottom (flexor) tendon may be repositioned to the top of the affected toe (flexor tendon transfer). Sometimes, the top or bottom tendon is released but not repositioned (tenotomy). Right after surgery, you can bear weight on your foot. You will have to wear a bandage, splint, and surgical shoe for several weeks.

CURLED FIFTH TOE

A curled fifth toe is most often inherited. When the fifth toe curls inward, it moves under the next toe. Then the nail of the curled toe starts to face outward. As a result, you may bear weight on the side of your toe instead of the bottom. This can cause corns and painful nails.

Derotation Arthroplasty. A wedge of skin and a section of bone are removed to help straighten (derotate) the toe. You can bear weight on your foot right after surgery. In some cases, you may need to wear a bandage, splint, and surgical shoe for a few weeks. When healed, the bones become connected with scar tissue.

RIGID HAMMERTOES

Rigid hammertoes are fixed (not flexible). You cannot straighten the buckled joints. Corns, pain, and loss of function may be more severe with rigid hammertoes than with flexible ones.

Arthroplasty. A part of the joint is removed, and the toe is straightened. In some cases, the entire joint may be replaced with an implant. You can bear weight on your foot right after surgery. You may need to wear a surgical shoe for a few weeks. When healed, the bones become connected with scar tissue, making your toe flexible.

Fusion. First, the cartilage and some bone on both sides of the joint are removed. Then, the toe is straightened, and the two bones are held together, often with a pin. The pin is removed after several weeks. You can bear weight on your foot right away. But you will need a surgical shoe for a few weeks. Once your foot heals, the toe will be less flexible, but more stable.

TOE SPUR

A bone spur on your toe may occur alone, or with other foot problems. Toe spurs have a number of causes and may result in pain when walking.

Minimal Incision Surgery. This procedure involves making only a small skin incision. A tiny power rasp (similar to a dental burr) or a special file is inserted to smooth the bone. After surgery, your foot will be bandaged, but you can walk on it right away. In some cases, you may need to wear a surgical shoe for a few weeks.

NEUROMA

When two metatarsal bones are squeezed together, they may pinch the nerve that runs between them. The pinched nerve can become swollen and painful. This often occurs at the base of the third and the fourth toes. Standing or walking for awhile can increase the pain.

Neuroma Removal. The enlarged portion of the inflamed nerve is removed. Most often, you can bear weight on your foot right away. You may have to wear a surgical shoe for a few weeks. When healed, a small area may feel numb, where part of the nerve was taken out.

PLANTAR CALLUS

When one metatarsal bone is longer or lower than the other, it presses on the skin beneath, forming a callus. Wearing shoes with thin soles and high heels can also put extra pressure on the ball of your foot. As a result, the callus may cause foot pain and irritation.

Oblique Osteotomy. The affected metatarsal bone is cut and aligned with the other metatarsals. Screws or pins may be used to hold the bone in position. To help you heal, you will have to wear a surgical shoe for a few weeks. The plantar callus goes away on its own over time.